The Temples of the Kings - Roadbook The Temples of the Kings - Roadbook

The Temples of the Kings

The “Jewels in the Crown” of Bangkok, the seven royal temples of eight Siamese kings also represents the finest of Rattanakosin art and culture. Roadbook will take you on a specially arranged journey of Thai architectural and decorative styles over the last two hundred years.

The Temple of King Rama I: Wat Pho is the oldest and largest temple in Bangkok, constructed in the 16th century during the Ayuthaya period and then almost completely rebuilt in 1781 by King Rama I. It features the largest reclining Buddha and collection of Buddha images in Thailand and was the earliest center for public education.

The Temple of King Rama II: Wat Arun is named after the Indian god of dawn, Aruna. Wat Arun has a long, elongated, Khmer-style prang, or the tower. And four minor towers symbolize Mount Meru, the terrestrial representation of the thirty-three heavens. The prang are covered with pieces of porcelain, which Chinese trading boats coming to Bangkok used as ballast.

The Temple of King Rama III: Wat Ratcha Orasa. King Rama III, before ascending the throne built this temple from the ruins of Wat Jom Thong which is known as the Monastery of the Royal Son. It is a unique temple in Bangkok period, strongly influenced by Chinese architecture.

The Temple of King Rama IV: Wat Ratchapradit Sathitmahasimaram. The most outstanding characteristic of the temple are the mural paintings in the main abbey depicting royal ceremonies undertaken throughout the 12 months including the legend of the eclipse of the sun.

The Temple of King Rama V and King Rama VII: Wat Ratchabophit. The mother of pearl doors and windows of the Bot (main hall) are refined, and the hand-painted tiles show European influence. During the reign of King Rama VII the temple underwent a major renovation.

The Temple of Rama VI: Wat Phra Pathom Chedi. It’s the most venerated Buddhist monument in Thailand. The original chedi was built by the Mon in the 10th century. All sorts of interesting items surround the chedi, including Buddhas in every pose, holy trees, replica chedis, museums and ceremonial halls. The ashes of King Rama VI, who completed the present day restoration, are here.

The Temple of King Rama VIII: Wat Suthat. It houses a 14th century Buddha surrounded by surreal depictions of Buddha’s last 24 lives. The courtyard is filled with statues of scholars and sailors brought as ballast in rice boats returning from China. In an annual ceremony to celebrate the rice harvest, men rode on the Giant Swing outside and tried to grab a bag of silver coins attached to a pole; only the red teak arch remains.

Bangkok

6 Hours

Entrance fees, snacks & drinks included

Offered in English

Transportation

Starting

11,500 THB

HK$2,365HK$17,872

Per Person

What to expect

In the morning, Roadbook will meet and greet you at your hotel lobby. We’ll depart to Wat Phra Pathom Chedi, the temple of King Rama VI. We then return to Bangkok to visit Wat Rachapradit, the temple of King Rama IV, and Wat Rachabophit, the temple of King Rama V and King Rama VII, and visit Wat Suthat, the temple of King Rama VIII. In the afternoon, we’ll visit the riverside Wat Pho, the temple of King Rama I, then take a long-tailed boat to visit Wat Arun, the temple of King Rama II and enjoy the scenery of the canals and traditional Thai ways of life before visiting Wat Racha Orasa, the temple of King Rama III before returning to your hotel in the late afternoon.

About Your Host

Roadbook is driven by a hand-picked team of local tastemakers, journalists and people with passion and stories to tell. With unrivalled access to unique individuals, places, and activities, we know Bangkok inside out and are brimming with street-level insights that will broaden your horizons.

What to expect

In the morning, Roadbook will meet and greet you at your hotel lobby. We’ll depart to Wat Phra Pathom Chedi, the temple of King Rama VI. We then return to Bangkok to visit Wat Rachapradit, the temple of King Rama IV, and Wat Rachabophit, the temple of King Rama V and King Rama VII, and visit Wat Suthat, the temple of King Rama VIII. In the afternoon, we’ll visit the riverside Wat Pho, the temple of King Rama I, then take a long-tailed boat to visit Wat Arun, the temple of King Rama II and enjoy the scenery of the canals and traditional Thai ways of life before visiting Wat Racha Orasa, the temple of King Rama III before returning to your hotel in the late afternoon.

About Your Host

Roadbook is driven by a hand-picked team of local tastemakers, journalists and people with passion and stories to tell. With unrivalled access to unique individuals, places, and activities, we know Bangkok inside out and are brimming with street-level insights that will broaden your horizons.

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The Temples of the Kings

The “Jewels in the Crown” of Bangkok, the seven royal temples of eight Siamese kings also represents the finest of Rattanakosin art and culture. Roadbook will take you on a specially arranged journey of Thai architectural and decorative styles over the last two hundred years.

The Temple of King Rama I: Wat Pho is the oldest and largest temple in Bangkok, constructed in the 16th century during the Ayuthaya period and then almost completely rebuilt in 1781 by King Rama I. It features the largest reclining Buddha and collection of Buddha images in Thailand and was the earliest center for public education.

The Temple of King Rama II: Wat Arun is named after the Indian god of dawn, Aruna. Wat Arun has a long, elongated, Khmer-style prang, or the tower. And four minor towers symbolize Mount Meru, the terrestrial representation of the thirty-three heavens. The prang are covered with pieces of porcelain, which Chinese trading boats coming to Bangkok used as ballast.

The Temple of King Rama III: Wat Ratcha Orasa. King Rama III, before ascending the throne built this temple from the ruins of Wat Jom Thong which is known as the Monastery of the Royal Son. It is a unique temple in Bangkok period, strongly influenced by Chinese architecture.

The Temple of King Rama IV: Wat Ratchapradit Sathitmahasimaram. The most outstanding characteristic of the temple are the mural paintings in the main abbey depicting royal ceremonies undertaken throughout the 12 months including the legend of the eclipse of the sun.

The Temple of King Rama V and King Rama VII: Wat Ratchabophit. The mother of pearl doors and windows of the Bot (main hall) are refined, and the hand-painted tiles show European influence. During the reign of King Rama VII the temple underwent a major renovation.

The Temple of Rama VI: Wat Phra Pathom Chedi. It’s the most venerated Buddhist monument in Thailand. The original chedi was built by the Mon in the 10th century. All sorts of interesting items surround the chedi, including Buddhas in every pose, holy trees, replica chedis, museums and ceremonial halls. The ashes of King Rama VI, who completed the present day restoration, are here.

The Temple of King Rama VIII: Wat Suthat. It houses a 14th century Buddha surrounded by surreal depictions of Buddha’s last 24 lives. The courtyard is filled with statues of scholars and sailors brought as ballast in rice boats returning from China. In an annual ceremony to celebrate the rice harvest, men rode on the Giant Swing outside and tried to grab a bag of silver coins attached to a pole; only the red teak arch remains.

Bangkok

6 Hours

Entrance fees, snacks & drinks included

Offered in English

Transportation

Starting
Per Person
Clear

What to expect

In the morning, Roadbook will meet and greet you at your hotel lobby. We’ll depart to Wat Phra Pathom Chedi, the temple of King Rama VI. We then return to Bangkok to visit Wat Rachapradit, the temple of King Rama IV, and Wat Rachabophit, the temple of King Rama V and King Rama VII, and visit Wat Suthat, the temple of King Rama VIII. In the afternoon, we’ll visit the riverside Wat Pho, the temple of King Rama I, then take a long-tailed boat to visit Wat Arun, the temple of King Rama II and enjoy the scenery of the canals and traditional Thai ways of life before visiting Wat Racha Orasa, the temple of King Rama III before returning to your hotel in the late afternoon.

About Your Host

Roadbook is driven by a hand-picked team of local tastemakers, journalists and people with passion and stories to tell. With unrivalled access to unique individuals, places, and activities, we know Bangkok inside out and are brimming with street-level insights that will broaden your horizons.